Post-op Resources

Normal Gastric Band vs. Slipped Gastric Band

In the fluoroscopic pictures below you can see an example of a normal Lap Band, where the band itself is at a 45 degree (3 o’clock to 8 o’clock) angle and there is a small pouch above it, and a slipped band.  With the slip the band is at a 10 o’clock to 3 o’clock position and there is a very large pouch above the band.

Slipped Gastric Band

Slipped Gastric Band

 

Normal Gastric Band

Normal Gastric Band

 

When a band is slipped, the patient will typically have vomiting and GERD issues.  The typical treatment is a complete unfill of the band.  In some cases the band will go back into position after a few weeks.  Sometimes, surgical intervention is required to reposition or remove a slipped band.

GERD After Gastric Band

Gastric reflux is not typical after a Lap Band.  New onset GERD in a band patient usually means:

  • the band is too tight and needs some saline removed
  • the band has slipped
  • the gastric pouch above the band is dilated, and acid is pooling there

These patients need to see a band surgeon, not a gastroenterologist!

If you have a patient in this scenario who needs to see us, click here to refer.

Nocturnal Regurgitation After Gastric Band

Nocturnal regurgitation also is not typical after a Lap Band.  Similar to GERD, this usually means:

  • the band is too tight and needs some saline removed
  • the band has slipped
  • the gastric pouch above the band is dilated, and acid is pooling there

These patients also need to see a band surgeon, not a gastroenterologist!

If you have a patient in this scenario who needs to see us, click here to refer.

Soft Calorie Syndrome After Gastric Band

Often times when Lap Band patients are not losing weight, they come in to get their band tightened.  Sometimes they will get too tight and revert to eating soft calories, such as potato chips and ice cream.  These soft foods will go through the band easily, but they cannot eat any protein.  This usually leads to weight gain, in spite of a tight band.  Patients who have this issue need to have some fluid taken out of their band.

GERD After Sleeve Gastrectomy

Gastric reflux after sleeve is sometimes seen and does not necessarily indicate a complication or abnormal anatomy.  Usually it is treated with proton pump inhibitors and will fade over a period of 3-6 months.  If GERD is persistent and difficult to control, an upper GI should be done to rule out obstruction.

Labwork After Sleeve or Gastric Bypass

Typically at post-op month 6 and 12, then yearly thereafter:  CBC, comprehensive metabolic profile, lipid profile, serum iron level, TIBC, serum vit D25 level, serum folate level, serum B12 level, serum B6 level, whole blood thiamine level

One thought on “Post-op Resources

  1. I am a 10+ year post op roux en y gastric bypass patient. I am not interested in an additional surgical procedure. However, I am working on getting back on track and I was talking with a friend of mine from my old gastric bypass support group who recommended I contact you. I currently weight 249 lbs and at my lowest was at 190. Ideally, I’d like to get down to 150-175 or at least 190. My friend mentioned you had products/services available to people wanting to get back on track (ie. vitamin or supplements) and I wondered if I could discuss that with you or someone on your staff. Thank you.

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